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Copyright © 2001-2017   Arthur   John   Huneke
ALL   RIGHTS   RESERVED


CLOWESVILLE

ON   MARCH   1,   1837   THE   RAILROAD   OPENED   TO   HICKSVILLE   -   BY   JUNE   1837   CLOWESVILLE
IS   LISTED   AS   A   STOP.   BY   JUNE   1845   CLOWSVILLE   (SIC)
IS   LISTED   WITH   THIS   NOTE:   "DURING   SESSION   OF   COURT".
THIS   IS   THE   LAST   TIME   WE   SEE   CLOWEVILLE   LISTED
UNTIL   EMPLOYE   TIME   TABLE   NUMBER   THREE   OF   JUNE   1897.




SINCE   GARDEN   CITY   PARK   WAS   AT   THE   LOCATION   OF
THE   LATER   MERILLON   AVENUE   STATION   CLOWESVILLE
COULD   NOT   HAVE   BEEN   THERE.

CLOWESVILLE   STATION   WAS   LOCATED   AT   HERRICKS   ROAD.

SUNY   STONY   BROOK   HAS   ON   THEIR   WEBSITE
THIS   1837   MAP     WHICH   SHOWS   CLOWESVILLE   THERE




L.I.R.R.   CROSSING   LISTS   FROM   1900,   1908,   1918   AND   1935
IDENTIFY   HERRICKS   ROAD   AS   "OLD   COURT   HOUSE   LANE".

THIS   LATE   1930'S   MAP   CALLS   IT   "OLD   COURT   HOUSE   ROAD".





THE   SAME   MAP   CALLS   THE   SECTION   BETWEEN   OLD   COUNTRY
ROAD     AND     JERICHO     TURNPIKE,     "CLOWESVILLE     LANE"



THIS   MAP   WAS   CREATED   BY   NASSAU   COUNTY   ENGINEER   JOHN   GUIBERT.



1873     BEERS     ATLAS




ON   THIS   1873   COLTON   MAP   FROM   THE   NEW   YORK   PUBLIC
LIBRARY   THE   NAME   CLOWESVILLE   BRACKETS   HERRICKS   ROAD


WE   THANK   JAMES   G.   FAWLES   FOR   THIS   MAP
AND   FOR   THE   FOLLOWING   INFORMATION:

Herricks Road is actually a VERY old road from the 1600s which went from Hempstead to Cow Neck (the Manhasset/Pt.Washington Peninsula), following the route of Rockaway Avenue from Hempstead to Old Country Rd, just south of LIRR. Rockaway Avenue was nearly a straight run for 250 years over its entire length until a golf Course in Garden City forced Rockaway Ave to bend to the west, past present-day Garden City High School.
Along with Roslyn Road (again 1600s: the Hempstead to Hempstead Harbor Road), Rockaway Ave/Herricks Road was the only significant N-S road anywhere near the Court House before the Civil War. Heading North from Old Country Road, Herricks Road immediately passes the LIRR Right-of- Way (and the site you've identified as Clowesville), passes the Court House at North Hempstead approx 1/2 mile north of LIRR, then continued to the community of Herricks, which was centered a bit southeast of today's Herricks High School. From there, you could take the road past Searingtown to Sands Point.

THANK   YOU   JAMES!

RELATIVE   TO   THE   FOLLOWING   ARTICLE   IS   THIS   FROM:

HISTORY   OF   QUEENS   COUNTY
with illustrations, Portraits & Sketches of Prominent Families and Individuals.
New York: W.W. Munsell & Co.; 1882.pp. 57-59.

"The practitioners in the inferior courts were residents in the
"county, such as : Samuel Clawes, father and son, 1710-53....."

FROM:   THE   ROSLYN   NEWS
ON   LINE   EDITION   FRIDAY   February   20,   2009
What Do You Know About Herricks?
In 1786, the new county courthouse and seat of government was opened a few hundred feet from what is now the northwest corner of Jericho Turnpike and Herricks Road. The area quickly got nicknamed "Clowesville," most certainly after Samuel Clowes (1722-1800) a high-ranking Queens County judge who purchased a house nearby. To many of the lawyers and others who had to trudge out there for official business, the dingy courthouse seemed to be truly in the middle of nowhere, and the name Clowesville may not have been exactly complimentary (half a century later, there was still just a single tavern and a few inns renting rooms nearby, among the scattered houses). On court days, farmers sold snacks, ales and liquor from booths (drunkenness at court was a longtime problem), and there were occasional fairs and other entertainments. In 1837, the railroad connected Jamaica and Hicksville, and on the days the courts or the Board of Supervisors (the county legislature) were in session, trains would make a Clowesville stop at approximately the location of the present Merillon Avenue Station (the fare from Brooklyn was 37 and one-half cents for many years). A permanent post office was opened in the courthouse, the first in North Hempstead township, and the vicinity was officially referred to as "North Hempstead" or "North Hempstead Post Office." Clowesville was still the common name of this place during the Civil War, but went out of use when the courthouse closed in 1877, probably having lost meaning.


THE   FOLLOWING   INFORMATION   IS   FROM   VARIOUS   SOURCES   INCLUDING:

THE   ROSLYN   NEWS,   WIKIPEDIA   AND   DAVID   ROBERTS   at   BROOKLYN   GENEALOGY

A permanent post office was opened in the courthouse, the first in North Hempstead township,
and the vicinity was officially referred to as "North Hempstead" or "North Hempstead Post Office."

THE ONLY POST OFFICE BETWEEN JAMAICA AND SUFFOLK COUNTY WAS "QUEENS"
ESTABLISHED SEPTEMBER 25, 1794.   A NEW BUILDING WAS ERECTED ABOUT 1787
IN AN AREA NEAR MINEOLA KNOWN THEN AS "CLOWESVILLE"
THIS HISTORIC POST OFFICE HAS HAD A VARIETY OF NAMES.
IT WAS OFFICIALLY QUEENS BUT THE AREA WAS KNOWN AS "QUEENS COURT HOUSE".
ON MAY 21, 1805 ITS NAME WAS CHANGED TO NORTH HEMPSTEAD .

FROM   AN   1838   REPORT:



THE   FORMER   COUNTY   COURTHOUSE   WAS   LOCATED   NORTHEAST   OF   THE
INTERSECTION   OF   JERICHO   TURNPIKE   AND   COUNTY   COURTHOUSE   ROAD.
HERRICKS   ROAD   HAD   BEEN   KNOWN   AS   "OLD   COURT   HOUSE   LANE".




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